Yogi’s ‘80 vs 20 battle’ utterance isn’t in good spirit

Uttar Pradesh polls an ‘80 vs 20 battle’ says Yogi Adityanath, and his statement points to a religious divide

So we all know Uttar Pradesh will go to the polling booths in seven phases starting February 10. And in a month’s time, March 10th to be precise, we will be able to know which party or alliance will get the reigns of the government for the next five years.

Even as parties have been looking to score the advantage and are grabbing every opportunity to climb on top, the UP Chief Minister and the man who wants to continue as Chief Minister has gone a step ahead. However, his utterances on Monday exposed his true colours!

As per his words, the election in Uttar Pradesh is an “80 vs 20 battle”. Everyone who has been tracking the state’s political, and social environment clearly knows that Adityanath’s words point to the religious divide that the state has been seeing.

UP polls an ‘80 vs 20 battle’ shows BJP attitude

While saying 80 vs 20, the UP Chief Minister has done what any political being active in a democratic arena as India should never have. By segregating 80 percent Hindus and 20 percent Muslims, Yogi Adityanath has brought to the fore, for election gains, the Bharatiya Janata Party’s attitude towards the minority Muslims.

By stating that it’s an 80 vs 20 battle, he has clearly stood on the side of the 80 percent, while dismissing the minority 20 percent with just an ill-aimed phrase. A state’s chief minister, or a prime minister of a country for that matter, is the representative of all the people, irrespective of what faith, community or anything of that sort they fall under. Political positions are a secular establishment in India, and anyone assuming power is obliged to hold close every single individual who is part of the land he or she rules over.

EC needs to note such behaviour

After having clearly showcased his feelings against a particular community, hastily trying to cove that up by defining the 80 percent as the supporters of nationalism, good governance and development wouldn’t minimise the hate that the saffron-clad Yogi Adityanath exudes. If at all one thinks that Adityanath was bracketing the 20 percent as anti-nationals, pro-mafia and all, that too isn’t a definition fit to have come out from a responsible person holding a responsible position.

Yogi Adityanath, actually, has been doing this for quite some time, after the poll campaigns were kicked off. He had earlier made barbed attacks on people who say “Abba Jaan”.

The political scenario in Uttar Pradesh, and of course in many other states too, has been tainted by such utterances. Appeasement and anti-minority feelings are being paraded in the most heinous manner. This is something the Election Commission should take into account seriously. Such hate needs to be penalised.

Back to top button