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The decision was taken by brand after sexual abuse allegations against Jackson resurfaced post the January release of the HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland”.

Saturday, March 16, 2019 —

French fashion house Louis Vuitton has decided to no longer producer pieces from the autumn/winter 2019 menswear collection that directly reference Michael Jackson.

The decision was taken by brand after sexual abuse allegations against Jackson resurfaced post the January release of the HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland”.

The label unveiled their collection in a show, which took place just over a week before “Leaving Neverland” premiered at Sundance. It featured several pieces that paid homage to Jackson that were then intended to go on sale in the summer.

“My intention for this show was to refer to Michael Jackson as a pop culture artist. It referred only to his public life that we all know and to his legacy that has influenced a whole generation of artists and designers,” Virgil Abloh, men’s artistic director at LV, said in a statement to the fashion news site WWD.

Representatives for the fashion house said the revelations had caused the label “the greatest pain” and the company was unaware of the documentary at the time of the show.

“I am aware that in light of this documentary the show has caused emotional reactions. I strictly condemn any form of child abuse, violence or infringement against any human rights.

Dan Reed’s Documentary “Leaving Neverland”

HBO aired the first half of Dan Reed’s controversial documentary “Leaving Neverland,” which details allegations by two men — James Safechuck and Wade Robson — who say Michael Jackson sexually abused them when they were boys.

The four-hour film, which concludes Monday night, has been slammed by the estate of the singer, who died in 2009, and his family, who called the documentary a “public lynching” in a statement earlier this year. Jackson’s fans also loudly attacked “Leaving Neverland,” which features interviews with Robson, Safechuck and their families, on social media.

Allegedly Michael Jackson Justified The Abuse

One of the most striking aspects of “Leaving Neverland” is the juxtaposition of Reed’s interviews with the men and their mothers. As the mothers recall the childhood activities their sons would do with Jackson, the men offer graphic descriptions of the alleged abuse, which they say began with the singer teaching them to masturbate and fondling them. The allegations get more disturbing from there — Safechuck says the singer performed oral sex on him while he was sleeping — and he describes abuse taking place in multiple rooms and properties across the Neverland estate, even as his family stayed on the grounds. At one point in the film, Safechuck shows several expensive rings that Jackson had bought him. “We would go buy them at jewellery stores, and we would pretend like they were for somebody else, like for a female, and he would pretend like my small hand fit whatever female we were buying it for,” he recalls. “I don’t like looking at the jewellery” now, he adds.

Robson recalled Jackson essentially justifying the abuse, telling him they were “meant to be together” and that they had been brought together by God. Robson also says Jackson showed him pornography.

Documentary States Jackson Exploited Tension

The abuse coincided with family issues for both Robson and Safechuck. Joy Robson recalls Jackson asking her to leave her son with him for a year so that he could mentor him in his career. Robson’s mother said no but did eventually move the young dancer and his sister to Los Angeles — to pursue career opportunities for Robson — against their father’s wishes.

Safechuck, meanwhile, said Jackson exploited the tension between his parents. He said he and the singer would eavesdrop on other people’s calls and sometimes heard his parents fighting. Safechuck recalls Jackson telling him that his mother was mean and that women were evil. “At the same time the sexual relationship is growing, he’s working on pushing you away from your parents, pushing you away from everybody else, and it feels more like it’s just you and him,” he explained.

(Documentary Details Sourced From Washington Post)