Baisakhi celebrated in Gurdwara Chati Padshahi Shadimarg in Pulwama

“The Chati Padshahi Gurdwara in Shadimarg is a historically significant building. Our 6th Guru, Hargobind Singh Sahib, came here with Mughal emperor Jahangir and lived here some 300 years ago,” a Sikh devotee said on the occasion.

PULWAMA (J&K)

On Wednesday, the Baisakhi festival was celebrated with great zeal and fervour in Shadimarg village of Pulwama district in southern Kashmir.

On the second day of the Baisakhi festival, thousands of Sikh devotees flocked to Shadimarg’s Chatti Padshahi Gurdwara to pay their respects by participating in Shabbat Keertan, Gurbani, and Akhand Paath.

District Development Commissioner Pulwama, Baseer-ul-Haq Choudhary along with other officials from the district administration also visited the Gurdwara on the occasion.

“The Chati Padshahi Gurdwara in Shadimarg is a historically significant building. Our 6th Guru, Hargobind Singh Sahib, came here with Mughal emperor Jahangir and lived here some 300 years ago,” President, Dr Ravi Singh, Gurdwara Prabandh Committee Pulwama, said. He added, “This Gurdwara was built at the same place where Guru Hargobind stayed.”

Baisakhi is observed for three days, according to a Sikh devotee. “The first day of Baisakhi is observed at our house, the second day here in Shadimarg, and the third day at the Gurdwara in Tral,” he said.

Another devotee said, “People from all over Kashmir and Punjab come to the Gurdwara, but due to COVID-19, we have seen less attendance from devotees from outside Kashmir.”

“Three days before the Baisakhi festival, the Gurdwara is painted, and members of the Muslim community assist in the painting, washing, and preparation of Langar, which is served to all devotees regardless of their religion,” he added.

Previous year, people of Kashmir witnessed one among many moments of brotherhood when Muslim youth sanitised the Gurudwara.

According to local Sikhs, the Gurdwara is a sign of shared brotherhood since a saint named Katu Shah, who is worshipped by Muslims, is buried nearby.

It is in place to mention here that Baisakhi, also called Vaisakhi, is known as the harvest festival of Punjab. It is celebrated by people across religions.

Other than marking the season of harvest, Baisakhi also has religious significance for the Sikhs. Baisakhi marks the beginning of the Sikh New Year.

Generally, the auspicious festival of Baisakhi is celebrated on April 13 or April 14 every year.

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Dil-Paziir (Urdu; meaning ‘heart-pleasing’) is a special edition positive news series brought to you by Digpu, sourced from conflict areas, starting from Kashmir. Our local journalists have successfully shared many inspirational stories from the valley – from the invention of E-Charkha, automatic ventilator in Kashmir, stories of brotherhood through to the first-ever cricket tourney for Blind sportsmen, all the stories make us awe-struck. These are NOT FOR REPRODUCTION.

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